Business Administration

Business Administration Transfer Program Course Descriptions

Award: Associate of Arts (AA)

VIEW SEQUENCE OF STUDY

ACC131 Principles of Accounting I

4 credits – This course is an introduction to basic financial accounting concepts and procedures for service and merchandising businesses. Topics included are the accounting cycle; accounting systems; financial statements; and accounting for cash, receivables, payables, inventories, plant assets; partnerships and corporations.

Lecture Hours: 64

ACC132 Principles of Accounting II

4 credits – This course continues to address topics in financial accounting that began in ACC131 Principles of Accounting I. Primary emphasis is on managerial accounting and the corporate form of ownership. Topics include accounting for bonds, the statement of cash flows, and financial statement analysis. Managerial accounting topics include job order and process cost systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, and standard cost systems. Capital investment analysis and activity-based costing are also addressed.

Lecture Hours: 64

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of C- in ACC131 Principles of Accounting I

BCA201 Introduction to Information Systems

3 credits – The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a firm understanding of management information systems. Included are an introduction to hardware and data communication technology, software and data management and business applications of the technology. The course will present the basics of information system design and management, and provide opportunities to experience working with an electronic spreadsheet, database management system, and programming using HTML.

Lecture Hours: 48

Other Requirements: Basic computer, software, and keyboarding skills are required.

BUS210 Business Statistics

3 credits – Application and interpretation of probability and statistics as they relate to business problems; design of experiment, descriptive statistics, sampling, estimation, correlation, linear regression, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variances.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT156 Statistics or equivalent or appropriate placement score

BUS230 Quantitative Methods for Business Decision Making

3 credits – Quantitative and qualitative aspects of problem solving and decision making in business are covered. Topics include structuring and the basics of decision making, classification theory, functional relationships, marginal analysis, resource allocation, and probability.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT156 Statistics

ECN120 Principles of Macroeconomics

3 credits – Principles of supply and demand and the price mechanism will be presented. Descriptions and interactions of the consumer, business, government, and international sectors will be studied as well as their effects on output, employment, and growth in the economy. The course includes a study of the banking system and monetary policy, fiscal policy, economic growth, differing macroeconomic viewpoints, and international issues.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'D-' in MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate Math placement score.

ECN130 Principles of Microeconomics

3 credits – Principles of supply and demand, elasticity, and pricing will be studied. The course includes such topics as resource allocation of firms, pricing and output decisions in different market structures, and consumer choice theory. International issues and the world economy will be integrated into the course.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: A minimum grade of 'D-' in MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate Math placement score.

ENG105 Composition I

3 credits – This course emphasizes fluency, thesis-driven organization, the use of supporting details, and research techniques. Writing is approached as a recursive process that includes prewriting strategies, drafting, revising, and editing. The course helps students shape writing to serve readers' needs and define a sense of purpose in their writing. It also gives students strategies for reading college-level material.

Lecture Hours: 48

ENG106 Composition II

3 credits – This course aims to review and extend writing principles learned in ENG105 Composition I to analytical, argumentative, and research-based writing. This course emphasizes critical reading, evaluation, and precise and responsible source citation.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: ENG105 Composition I

HIS117 Western Civilization I: Ancient and Medieval

3 credits – This course traces the development of Western Civilization from prehistory to 1300 C.E., the end of the High Middle Ages. The role of the Humanities is emphasized. The course explores major political, social, economic, scientific, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments contributing to Western societies. These include the significant events and contributions of early Middle Eastern civilizations, classical and Hellenistic Greece, the Roman Empire, its successors, the rise of the Western Christian church, and Medieval Europe.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS118 Western Civilization II: Early Modern

3 credits – This course surveys the development of Western Civilization covering the end of the High Middle Ages of Europe to the French Revolution. The role of the Humanities is emphasized. The course will examine the major political, social, economic, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments contributing to the emergence of modern Western European Society. This includes the significant events and contributions of the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Columbian Exchange, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS119 Western Civilization III: The Modern Period

3 credits – This course will continue exploring the development of Western Civilization covering the period from the French Revolution until the present. The role of the Humanities is emphasized. The course will examine the major political, social, economic, intellectual, cultural, and religious developments contributing toward Western Society. Included are such major developments as the industrial revolution, the French revolution, Romanticism, European colonialism, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, the new European order, and the world of the Twenty-first Century.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS151 U.S. History to 1877

3 credits – This United States history course examines the country's Colonial experience, Revolutionary period, and 19th Century history through Reconstruction. The course includes political, economic, and social history of this period, as well as the development of American thought.

Lecture Hours: 48

HIS152 U.S. History Since 1877

3 credits – This United States history course examines the period from the end of reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is placed upon industrialization and its impact, the development of a strong federal government, an aggressive foreign policy, and a growing involvement in an international economy. The course includes political, economic, and social history of this period, as well as the development of American thought.

Lecture Hours: 48

MAT156 Statistics

3 credits – This course is a study of descriptive statistics including graphical representation, central tendency, correlation and regression, intuitive treatment of probability, and inferential statistics including hypothesis testing.

Lecture Hours: 48

Pre-requisites: MAT063 Elementary Algebra or appropriate placement score.

POL111 American National Government

3 credits – This course is a study of the United States national government, specifically its institutions, the process of governing, the means by which individual citizens and groups influence that process, and the output of that governing process.

Lecture Hours: 48

PSY111 Introduction to Psychology

3 credits – This course provides an introduction to the study of behavior with emphasis in the areas of learning, cognition, motivation, personality, behavioral disorder, therapy, and social influence. An understanding of the impact of both theoretical perspectives and experimental evidence on the formulation of the science of human behavior is also stressed. Psychological theories and principles are utilized to explain and predict behavior.

Lecture Hours: 48

SOC110 Introduction to Sociology

3 credits – This course surveys the basic principles, concepts, and research findings of social life from small groups to societies. The course examines a range of sociological explanations for the various forms of social behaviors and establishes a basis for reflection and further study in the field.

Lecture Hours: 48

SPC101 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

3 credits – This course presents elements of the oral communications process with emphasis in developing public speaking skill. Students will be involved in activities that provide opportunity for the understanding and improvement of their oral communication skills.

Lecture Hours: 48

 

Program Contacts

Department Secretary

Cindi Clark
Black Hawk Hall 177
319-296-4021
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Program Advisors

Todd Stabenow
Black Hawk Hall 253
319-296-2329 ext.1375
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Joseph Toe
Black Hawk Hall 182
319-296-2329 ext.1376
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Roger Davis
Black Hawk Hall 181
319-296-2329 ext.1754
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Dean

Bryan Renfro
Black Hawk Hall 180
319-296-4427
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